Article Details Evolving Trends in Catastrophic Workers' Compensation Claims

We ran across an article by Insurance Business recently that details some evolving trends in catastrophic workers’ compensation cases.  We took a particular interest in this because while not all of the cases we assist in settling are catastrophic in nature, many of them are, and maintaining a keen understanding of the trends within the workers’ compensation industry helps us to better understand our client’s current approach to settling claims.  

 The article indicates the soft market experienced by the workers’ compensation industry over the last several years may be reversing.  There are a variety of factors that contribute to the current landscape of catastrophic workers’ compensation claims, including injury frequency, escalating costs of medical goods and services, and the advancement of modern medicine and procedures that prolong the life of injured workers.

 In our experience, these types of trends can elevate the status of a workers’ compensation claim from “standard” to “legacy” quick, fast, and in a hurry.  It simply becomes less and less advantageous to settle a claim when projecting the escalating costs of medical needs over one’s lifetime. It is imperative to get out ahead of these claims and implement mitigation strategies to help resolve them once and for all.  We are here to help bridge the settlement gap and assist our clients in tackling these difficult to settle cases in their entirety.

 Again, our thanks to Insurance Business for a very informative article that can be read by clicking here.

CMS Rings in the New Year with an Updated WCMSA Reference Guide

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) wished us all a Happy New Year by releasing the latest version of the Workers’ Compensation Medicare Set Aside (WCMSA) Reference Guide on January 4, 2019. The noted updates are as follows:

·     To eliminate issues around Development Letter and Alert templates auto populating with individual Regional Office (RO) reviewer names and direct phone numbers, these will now display the generic “Workers’ Compensation Review Contractor (WCRC)” and the WCRC customer service number “(833) 295-3773” (Appendix 5). 

·     Per CMS’ request, certain references to memoranda on cms.gov have been removed. 

·     The CDC Life Table has been updated for 2015 (Section 10.3). 

·     Updates have been provided for spinal cord stimulators and Lyrica (Sections 9.4.5 and 9.4.6.2) 

While the above bullet points are specifically highlighted as updates, it is worth mentioning that there are several instances within the WCMSA Reference Guide where CMS highlights the fact that the submission of a Medicare Set-Aside (MSA) to CMS for approval is a voluntary process. However, the WCMSA Reference Guide goes on to indicate that receiving CMS approval of an MSA is “the only process that offers both Medicare beneficiaries and Workers’ Compensation entities finality, with respect to obligations for medical care required after settlement, award, or other payment occurs.”  While, the workers’ compensation settlement community continues to explore alternatives to CMS approval including Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) MSAs, and other non-submission programs, the goal of these approaches should always be to avoid shifting the burden of paying for post-settlement treatment to Medicare.  

To view the updated WCMSA Reference Guide in its entirety, please click here.

LASIE Looks to Build on Momentum Gained from Burgess Decision

Louisiana employers and workers’ compensation insurers received a bit of financial relief last summer when the Louisiana Supreme Court held that employers were free to choose which pharmacy injured workers are to use to fill their prescription medications related to their industrial injury.  The decision reached by the court in Burgess v. Sewerage and Water Board of New Orleans was a pivotal first step in reining in rising workers’ compensation costs in Louisiana.

Additionally, the Supreme Court recognized the possibility that even though medical fees may fall within the amounts established in the reimbursement schedule, they may also be declared unreasonable and not subject to compensation under certain circumstances.  This decision could very well leave the door open to future legal arguments against unreasonable medical services provided by outpatient facilities.  

On the heels of the Burgess decision, our good friends at the Louisiana Association of Self Insured Employers (LASIE) are hosting a seminar on Monday, April 16, 2018 in Baton Rouge to not only discuss the financial impacts the Burgess Decision has had on pharmacy costs in Louisiana over the past 9 months, but will also offer up valuable bits of information from attorneys in Louisiana on the practical implications this decision should have on a workers’ compensation program. For registration information on this seminar, please click here.